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Just a few sentences for each is all…Hey buddy…create a timetable of key human fossils going back two-million years ago (i.e., 2 mya) in chronological order. List each fossil’s key anatomical features. Be sure to include evolutionary “dead ends” that were not part of the lineage of modern humans. Before you begin, review the provided example timetable to get an idea of what you might create. Your completed timetable should include 7 to 8 examples. also to the example graphic, you will also find a partially completed table that will assist you as you brainstorm fossils to include in your chart. Feel free to complete the table as a way to populate your chart with data…The content is far more important than your artistic expertise. Be sure to include the following: • Key periods • Major fossils as outlined in text • Anatomical features of fossils • Dead ends that were not part of the lineage of modern humans.. create a chart AGE.. FOSSIL ….ANATOMICAL FEATURES ARE THE THREE LABELS FOR THE TIMETABLE. TOP OF THE TIMETABLE. OK COOL

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3pages…Fossils and the Impact of Primate Evolution. In the Fossils section, you will identify prominent fossils and illustrate their relationship to evolution and variability. In the Impact of Primate Evolution section, the goal is to teach museum visitors about the impact of primate evolution on modern behaviors. Fossils: In this section, you will identify prominent fossils and illustrate their relationship to evolution and variability. A. Identify prominent fossils (in hominid and hominin line) that represent biological anthropology across time and geographic space, justifying your recommendations. In order to provide a sufficient representation, you will need to recommend multiple fossils. B. Analyze the fossils you recommended to determine their relationship to human biological evolution, substantiating your analysis with research. In other words, how do these fossils inform our understanding of human biological evolution through time and geographic space? What insight do the fossils provide into how humans evolved biologically? C. Analyze the fossils you recommended to determine their relationship to human biological variation, substantiating your analysis with research. In other words, how do these fossils inform our understanding of human biological variation through time and geographic space? What insight do the fossils provide into how humans evolved biologically? D. Explain how the museum can ethically obtain and display these fossils. Consider questions such as these in your response: Where will they get the fossils? Will compensation be necessary? Can they use the real fossil, or would a cast replica be preferable? Are there any downsides to using a replica? What considerations are involved in deciding how to protect and display the specimen? III. Impact of Primate Evolution: In this section, the museum would like visitors to learn about the impact of primate evolution on modern behaviors. A. Identify prominent examples that illustrate primate (not in hominid/hominin line) anatomical evolution, and provide a detailed explanation. How do the examples illustrate the major events of primate anatomical evolution? B. Analyze the impact of the selected primate anatomical evolution examples for how they present themselves in modern primate behaviors. What connections can you see between the primate anatomy and modern primate behaviors? C. Identify examples that illustrate evidence of the evolutionary split between apes and monkeys and, later, between apes and humans. How do these examples illustrate the major differences and what are the specific extinct behaviors of the groups? D. What ethical considerations are involved in deciding what information or items to display? For example, would be it better to use captive live animals to demonstrate primate behavior versus videos of primates in their natural habitat? Why? Are there any ethical considerations related to how the museum might obtain primate anatomical specimens or replicas? IV. Deconstructing Race: In this section, the museum wants visitors to learn about race from an anthropological stance. A. Explain from an anthropological view what it means for race to be socially and culturally constructed. In other words, how do anthropologists explain race as a social and cultural construction? B. Identify modern-day examples the museum could use in their display to illustrate how race is socially and culturally constructed. C. Explain the difference between the idea of race as a social and cultural construct and how biological anthropologists view race. How do biological anthropologists view race in a different way than society views race? D. Articulate how the museum can explain the concept of race from a biological anthropological view using genetics and biological anthropological theoretical perspectives. Consider questions such as these in your response: What examples can be used to deconstruct the culturally or socially constructed idea of race? How can genetics explain how biological anthropologists view race? What biological anthropological theory supports this view? E. Explain the relationship between a biological anthropological view of race and cultural relativism. Why is it important that a biological anthropologist employ a cultural relativist perspective when studying the concept of race? e goal is to teach museum visitors about the impact of primate evolution on modern behaviors. goal is to teach museum visitors about the impact of primate evolution on modern behaviors. Deconstructing Race. One of the requirements from the museum is that the exhibit teach visitors about race from an anthropological stance. To do this, you will write and provide examples of the social and cultural construction of race, and make distinctions between the social and cultural construct view of race and the biological anthropologists’ view of race. From there, the museum asks that you explain the concept of race from a biological anthropological view using genetics and theoretical perspectives. Finally, you will make distinctions between a biological view of race and cultural relativism cool